French Quarter Art Walk

Disher, Hamrick & Myers is proud to be located in the heart of the city’s original commercial district on Broad Street in the French Quarter of historic downtown Charleston. And one of our neighborhood’s favorite events is coming up. The first Friday in March, May, October and December is the Charleston Gallery Association’s French Quarter Art Walk. Over 40 galleries and shops stay open from 5-8 in the evening to welcome art lovers and guests. Many serve wine and light refreshments and host artists and exhibit openings. USAToday named the art walk one of the  10BEST “Free Things to Do” in Charleston.

ART WALK INSIDER TIPS

All the participants are within walking distance and maps can be picked up at any location. You may start at any one and visit as many as you wish at your own pace. Strike up a lively conversation with a gallery owner or artist. Discuss your reaction to a painting or sculpture, and maybe even find a piece to add to your own collection. Art prices are very accessible, ranging from prints and original pieces available for under $50 to larger pieces of fine art and jewelry priced in the tens of thousands of dollars. There is truly the opportunity for everyone to find something they can afford and enjoy.

French Quarter art walkArchitecture buffs should be sure to take advantage of the opportunity to see inside and behind the buildings normally only glimpsed from the street front. To make the most of your experience, venture off the beaten path to shops and galleries that are located in alleyways or on the second or third levels of buildings. The streets will be bustling with locals and visitors of all ages.

After the art walk, treat yourself to a cocktail or dinner at one of the French Quarter’s restaurants, like the upscale Oak Steakhouse or Disher, Hamrick & Myers’ neighbor, the Blind Tiger Pub. The weather should be pleasantly warm and sunny, presenting the perfect opportunity to stroll the historic streets of downtown Charleston. Beautiful weather, art, architecture, food, drink and company – what more could you ask for on a Friday evening? We look forward to seeing you all there!

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Southern Holiday Traditions

How do you celebrate Christmas in Charleston and where did those traditions originate? The South is rich in history, and Charleston is no exception. Did you know that Southern states were the first to adopt Christmas as a legal holiday? (Alabama in 1836, followed by Louisiana and Arkansas in 1838.) Over the years, it’s no surprise that many regional Southern holiday traditions have spread around the country.

CHARLESTON’S POINSETTIA ROOTS

Southern holiday poinsettiaToday we hail the poinsettia as the official plant of the Christmas season. Did you know this is thanks to a South Carolina gentleman by the name of Joel Robert Poinsett? Poinsett was in the US House of Representatives and also served as the Minister to Mexico. While on a trip to Mexico in 1925, he discovered the festive red-colored flower. He brought it home to Charleston and introduced it as a holiday adornment. The rest is history. Today, throughout the South and the nation you will see these beautiful flowers displayed on the inside and outside of homes during the Yuletide season.

CITRUS FOR THE SEASON

Southern holiday citrus decorationsIt is a Southern holiday tradition to this day for Santa to leave some citrus fruit in children’s stockings. No, it’s not a gimmick to take up space. Years ago, finding citrus in your stocking in the middle of winter was a luxury. Citrus was only available during certain seasons of the year, so to receive an orange at Christmas was a special and expensive treat. Decorating wreaths, trees and holiday decor with different citrus fruits is still a tradition today. In fact, take a tour around Downtown Charleston or visit one of the museum houses to see citrus and evergreen decorations on the outsides as well as interiors of historic Charleston homes. To view some beautiful examples, visit The Charleston Museum’s blog showcasing the Garden Club of Charleston’s traditional holiday decorations at the Joseph Manigault House. They will be on display to the public through December 31.

FRIED TURKEY, OYSTERS & PECAN PIE

Southern holiday oystersWhat would a Southern meal be without any of these delicacies? Fresh oysters are popular during the holiday season because their harvest is best during the coldest time of year. (Remember the old adage that oysters are good during months that have an “R” in their names.) Deep frying as a preparation for turkey also originated in the South. And don’t forget the pecan pie for dessert. The documented history of this recipe dates back to the 1880s. Legend says the French in New Orleans made a version of it after Native Americans introduced them to the pecan tree. Today this gooey, delicious Southern treat has spread across the country and is a staple this time of year. Visit Southern Living for a variety of delicious pecan pie recipes and other traditional Southern holiday foods.

What holiday treats and traditions does your family celebrate? Please share in the comments. Disher, Hamrick & Myers wishes HAPPY HOLIDAYS to all!
 

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Fort Sumter Hotel

Fort Sumter House at 1 King Street began its existence as the Fort Sumter Hotel, which opened to guests in 1924. Designed by prominent commercial architect G. Lloyd Preacher of Atlanta, GA, the Spanish Colonial-style structure was built at a cost of $850,000. The 7-story building is located along the South Battery, directly adjacent to White Point Garden. At its inception, it was the tallest building as well as the only luxury hotel on the Charleston Peninsula. A 1929 brochure boasts, “spacious lobbies, sun parlors and terraces, comfortable and luxuriously furnished, overlook the water and offer cordial hospitality in an atmosphere to be found in few hotels.”

Fort Sumter Hotel 1924 postcard

The Fort Sumter Hotel near its opening in 1924

The second floor featured a grand ballroom and lounge. The ground level housed a dining room which for many years was one of downtown Charleston’s few restaurants. From 1954-1973, this eatery was called the Rampart Room. It was decorated with images of Southern Colonels and murals of Charleston scenes. A rarity in its time, it touted air conditioning and “manufactured ice” in its drinks.

FAMOUS VISITORS

The Fort Sumter Hotel has had its share of notable guests. John F. Kennedy, then a young Naval intelligence officer, stayed in 1942. While there, he engaged in a tryst with a suspected German spy that was recorded by the FBI. The ensuing scandal changed the course of history. Playwright Tennessee Williams and Producer Irene Selznick visited in 1947. In fact, Williams hand wrote scenes for “A Streetcar Named Desire” on hotel stationery. Between those dates it served as the headquarters for the Sixth Naval District (prior to its move to the old Navy Base), before being remodeled and returned to hotel operation.

Throughout the 1950s, famed Charleston Renaissance artist Alfred Hutty’s paintings and etchings were on permanent exhibit in the hotel. He even held annual exhibitions there in the hopes of selling this work to the steadily-growing number of tourists in the Holy City. His 1949 mural “Attack on Fort Sumter” still hangs in the hotel lobby today.

 

CONDO CONVERSION

In 1967, Sheraton purchased the hotel for $435,000 and spent half a million dollars on renovations. They would be the last corporation to run the Fort Sumter as a hotel. In 1973, a group of local investors bought the property for $850,000 – the same price as it originally cost to build half a century earlier. The Fort Sumter Hotel closed in 1973 and its 225 rooms were converted into 67 condominiums at a cost of $2 million. The condo conversion required a change in zoning which then-Mayor Palmer Gaillard said would “have a major significance on zoning throughout the city.” A contemporary marketing piece noted that “Fort Sumter House represents the only high-rise structure of its kind in the historic area of the city, local sentiment and strict zoning dictate that no other structures of this height can ever be constructed.” Today, there are 72 residential units and businesses have returned to the ground floor. Fort Sumter House is one of many notable examples of adaptive reuse in this historic city.

1 King Street 709, Fort Sumter House aerial viewResidents of the building enjoy panoramic views of White Point Gardens, historic Battery mansions, city rooftops and steeples, the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, Patriots Point and the Yorktown, and even Fort Sumter and the Atlantic Ocean. The South of Broad location at the corner of King Street and Murray Blvd. can’t be beat. Amenities include on-site security, parking lots, an exercise room and private palmetto tree-lined pool along the Battery. If you would like to live in this piece of Charleston history, Disher, Hamrick & Myers is offering a top floor, corner unit for sale. Contact Real Estate Agent Saida A. Russell at 843.478.9391 for more information.

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Crafts House – Adaptive Reuse From School to Condos

Charleston is a city full of successful adaptive architecture. Recently, the American College of the Building Arts opened its campus in the former Trolley Barn. The DHM Blog has previously profiled the condominiums at 3 Chisolm Street in the old Murray Vocational School. But this isn’t the only area school building repurposed into residences. The Crafts House at 67 Legare Street was originally home to a free school for children founded by antebellum Charleston lawyer, poet and philanthropist, William Crafts (1787-1826). Crafts was a Harvard University graduate who served in both houses of the South Carolina General Assembly.

Crafts was an advocate for free public education, and as such, purchased the property at the corner of the current Queen and Legare Streets for this purpose. He built his first school, designed by Edward C. Jones, in 1859. He called it the Friend Street School after the road’s original name. That building burned in a fire during the Civil War in 1861. A new Gothic Revival building designed by architects Abrahams and Seyle replaced it in 1881. This style, featuring buttresses and lancet arches, mimics that of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist just across Legare Street.

Crafts House Condos in downtown Charleston

By the turn of the 20th century, the Crafts School accommodated over 1200 students in 14 classrooms. In 1915, a three-story wing (seen on the right side of the accompanying photo) was added by David Hyer, who also designed Buist Academy. The Crafts School served the area’s children until the 1970s. After that, the building was used as administrative offices until the mid-1980s, when it was remodeled into condominiums. Today, the Crafts House features 31 one- and two- bedroom units in the heart of Harleston Village. Residents can enjoy views of St. Michael’s, St. Phillip’s, and St. John’s Church steeples while listening to their sonorous chiming of the hours from the nicely landscaped gardens surround the building.

 

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Charleston’s Corinthian Columns

Charleston is a city that’s crazy about columns. It’s been that way since the early days. In fact, a few of our more historic columns have survived challenges that turned other architectural treasures to rubble. Civil War shelling, earthquakes, hurricanes and the periodic insanity of urban renewal have been flattening buildings for centuries, but occasionally their original columns live on.

A good example can be found in the ruins of the old Charleston Museum at Rutledge and Calhoun streets. The building is gone with the wind (or fire, in this case), but its columns, with their beautiful Corinthian capitals, have been preserved. Columns like the old Museum’s have become symbols of our community’s grace and grit. Many are in the Corinthian style, an ornate design said to be inspired by a basket left as a graveside offering in the fifth century BC.

According to legend, a Greek architect named Callimachus noticed the way an acanthus plant weaved its leaves up through the basket. He was so taken by this vision, he carved it into a new capital — the decorative topmost section of a column. Instead of the simple lines of the Doric capitals or the swirling arms of Ionic columns, the new design was far more elaborate. It never really caught on with his fellow Greeks, but the Romans fell in love with it. The upper tier of the Coliseum is Corinthian, and Roman builders used the flowery shape throughout Europe to decorate everything from aqueducts to stands for potted plants.

DHM Real Estate Agent Ruthie SolidayHere in Charleston, you’ll see variations of the Corinthian capital in some of our most beautiful residential, civic and commercial architecture — old as well as new. Many South of Broad single houses employ the classical order on their piazzas, with Corinthian columns on the top level. Throughout its history, Charleston’s architects have maintained a love affair with the Corinthian capital. However, its beauty and strength goes beyond architecture: just take a look at Disher, Hamrick & Myers’ logo. Whether it’s on a real estate sign or a tall entryway column, the Corinthian design is one of the most enduring and popular in Charleston.

 

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The Charleston Single House

The single house is an architectural style found almost exclusively in Charleston, SC and this home plan gives the historic city much of its unique charm. The layout of a single house is ideally suited to the narrow street-facing lots originally laid out in Charleston in the late 17th and early 18th centuries (see Grand Modell). The homes are only one room wide and two rooms deep on each level, with a central hall between. Typically a porch, or piazza as it is known in Charleston, runs the length of the house with a public door facing the street. Visitors must enter the home through this entrance and traverse the porch before entering the central private door into the home. To take best advantage of prevailing breezes, piazzas always face south or west.

Charleston Single House at 62 Tradd St.

Public spaces, like an entry or office, inhabit the first floor. Entertaining spaces, such as drawing rooms, withdrawing rooms or ballrooms occupy the second floor – above the hustle and bustle (and mess and smells) of the streetways. Family spaces and bedrooms are found on the third floor. Each room would incorporate more or less decorative detail according to its use, with second floor spaces having the highest ceilings with intricate and colorful moldings. Those high ceilings, coupled with tall windows (often floor-length to accommodate walking out to the piazzas) allowed breezes to flow through the rooms and helped make Lowcountry weather more bearable.

Outbuildings, such as kitchens, stables and carriage houses, were constructed separate from the main house to the rear of the property. Today, many of these have been converted into separate residences (and given rise to the unique ½ address that dot the Charleston Peninsula). Other outbuildings were later connected to the main residence via “hyphens.” Kitchens were built away from the main house in an attempt to prevent fires — such as the numerous ones that destroyed large swaths of the peninsula — from spreading to the living quarters. This is also why the back wall of the main houses had fewer windows than might be expected for ventilation.

Charleston Single House at 45 Church St.

Various decorative styles have been applied to the single house layout, including Federal, Greek Revival, Italianate and Victorian. Two and three-story piazzas often employ the classical order of columns with the ground level being Doric, followed by Ionic and Corinthian. Formal gardens beautified the side yards to be enjoyed from the shady porches. In fact, upper porches were sometimes used as sleeping quarters on hot, humid nights.

Don’t believe a tour guide who tells you single houses were a reaction to the city taxing street frontage. Instead, “early Charlestonians developed the Single House as an ingenious solution to the various demands of their unique urban landscape: a house that provided privacy, ventilation, fire protection, and social status within the confines of a tightly restrictive public space.” (credit Charleston County Pubic Library)

Disher, Hamrick & Myers Real Estate currently has several archetypical singles houses for sale in downtown Charleston: 24 King Street, 286A Meeting Street, 286C Meeting Street and 9 Bogard Street. If this style historic home appeals to you, contact us for a showing!

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Feel at Home in Harleston Village

Downtown’s Harleston Village — bordered by Calhoun, Broad and King Streets and the Ashley River — is one of Charleston’s oldest neighborhoods. The land was granted to John Coming and Henry Hughes in 1671-1672. John was first mate on the Carolina, one of the first ships to bring settlers to the colony. Upon Coming’s death, the property passed to his wife’s nephew, John Harleston. The Harleston family was active in colonial government, and the subsequent neighborhood inherited this surname. The village was developed for residential and other uses by 1770. Its streets were named after prominent men of the day, including Beaufain, Bull, Gadsden, Montagu, Pitt and Rutledge. Tidal marshes along the Ashley River powered numerous lumber mills that dotted the area until the arrival of steam power in the 1880s. Housing also continued to populate the neighborhood throughout the 18th and 19th centuries.

Harleston Village is the home to several historic “firsts.” The College of Charleston was established in 1770, the same year as the neighborhood. The CofC is the oldest educational institution in the state, and indeed the oldest south of Virginia. It was also the nation’s first municipal college. The first golf club in America, c. 1786, played in Harleston Village. The golf course is likely the origin of the appellation “Harleston Green,” which is another common name for the neighborhood.

 

PUBLIC PARKS

At the heart of Harleston Village is Colonial Lake Park. Its origins date back to 1768, when an Act of the Commons House of Assembly set aside land for a park that would always remain for public use. It was known as the Colonial Commons. By 1869, what became known as the Rutledge Street Pond was completed. For decades, small boats were allowed on the water. In 1881, it was renamed Colonial Lake after the old Colonial Commons, and that name remains today. In the early 1880s, a landscaped promenade was built around the lake. The grounds have been continually improved, with the most recent overhaul having just been completed in 2016. Today, the picturesque park is surrounded by grand old homes and attracts families, dog walkers, joggers and visitors alike. Across Ashley Avenue is Moultrie Playground, which also has tennis and basketball courts, a baseball field and picnic areas. These facilities make the area popular with families, outdoor enthusiasts, and fitness buffs alike.

Columns of the Old Charleston Museum, Cannon Park, Harleston Village, Downtown CharlestonAnother popular public space in Harleston Village is Cannon Park, which houses the columns of the old Charleston Museum, which burned down in 1981. But that site is not the only place where you might experience the ghosts of Charleston past in Harleston Village. Another square that was reserved for public use in 1680 became the site of a hospital, poor house, runaway slave workhouse and eventually the Old Charleston Jail – reputed to be one of Charleston’s most haunted places. Most recently used by the American College of the Building Arts, the structure is now under consideration for renovation into office space that will also allow for tours of the site.

 

A WALKABLE NEIGHBORHOOD

Much of the neighborhood is walkable, with markets, coffee shops, and restaurants all nearby. Some of the more popular dining options, from fine dining to waterfront casual, are:

Harleston Village has a diverse mix of housing. Options range from historic 18th, 19th and 20th century mansions, to converted condominiums (like 55 Ashley Avenue, once the Baker Hospital), to more modern homes and tall condo buildings. With the College of Charleston inside its borders, you‘ll find a combination of students and renters along with homeowners. This is an ideal location for investment properties as well as primary residences. DHM currently has an excellent investment opportunity in Harleston Village consisting of 4 multifamily homes with off-street parking for 20 vehicles. We also have a condo at 63 Rutledge Avenue. For more information and help navigating the real estate market in Harleston Village, count on Disher, Hamrick & Myers to Open Every Door…

View All Homes For Sale in Harleston Village

 

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South of Broad – A Walk Through History

Take a step back into history and explore the beautiful antebellum neighborhood South of Broad in Charleston, South Carolina. The district dates back to 1721 and features rare historic homes amongst cobblestone streets. One of the true gems of the South, this neighborhood is a beloved part of downtown Charleston. It boasts traditional southern architecture and homes that look straight out of an American storybook.

St Michael's, South of BroadWhile Charleston has many beautiful and unique neighborhoods to offer residents and visitors alike, South Broad is arguably the most renowned. Located between the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, many of its well-preserved homes offer views of the Charleston Harbor. It encompasses the original walled city of Charleston as well as early-20th century infill projects. Famous Rainbow Row is located South Broad. This stretch of East Bay Street hosts several colonial Georgian row homes painted different pastel colors and is a top tourist attraction in Charleston. The Four Corners of Law, so-named by Robert Ripley, is at the intersection of Meeting and Broad Streets. In this part of town you’ll see guests in horse-drawn carriages viewing the grand mansions.

ATTRACTIONS

Some key sites to visit South of Broad include:

Battery and White Point Garden: a public park with Spanish moss-draped oaks and Civil War cannons. It is bounded by a seawall walkway where Charlestonians like to say the Ashley and Cooper Rivers combine to create the Atlantic Ocean.

Sword Gate House: the oldest residence on Legare Street, with its famous wrought iron gates that match the pair at the Citadel.

Heyward-Washington House: a museum house of The Charleston Museum. Declaration of Independence signer Thomas Heyward, Jr. lived there. President George Washington stayed there during his 1791 visit to the city.

Edmonston-Alston House: another residence that is open to the public. Stand on the porch where General P.G.T. Beauregard watched the bombardment of Ft. Sumter, starting the Civil War. Still owned by the Alstons, its collection houses many historic family pieces.

Calhoun Mansion: the largest private home in Charleston. You may tour this Italianate beauty’s extensive collection of decorative arts and furniture, and even access the widow’s walk for an incomparable birds-eye view of the lower peninsula.

Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon: one of the America’s most-important Colonial civic structures. Your tour includes one of the few places to see an exposed part of Charleston’s original wall.

SOUTH OF BROAD DINING

Don’t take offense if someone refers to you as an SOB; in Charleston, it’s a moniker for those who live South of Broad. A popular restaurant just up East Bay Street has made a clever play on this term, calling itself SNOB, short for Slightly North of Broad. Enjoy their local shrimp and grits for dinner or Sunday brunch.

The Battery, South of BroadWhile the area is mostly residential, you’ll also find plenty to entertain. Stroll through the shops and art galleries along Broad Street and the French Quarter or attend one of the quarterly Art Walks. For a bite to eat, enjoy a glass of wine and a cheese plate at goat.sheep.cow, which is housed in a building over 200 years old. In nice weather, why not pack a picnic lunch for White Point Gardens? For a relaxed meal in a social atmosphere, you have the Blind Tiger Pub, named for Charleston’s infamous speakeasies. In the mood for French food? Join a communal table at Gaulart & Maliclet. If you prefer a fine-dining option, try Oak Steakhouse. And to wet your whistle, be sure to stop by The Tavern to pick up some local spirits. Founded in 1686, it’s the oldest liquor store in the country.

As you explore the alleyways and streets South of Broad, you’ll notice the unique Charleston Single House style of architecture that lends the city much of its historic charm. Most of the homes are covered by easements to retain this historic look and fabric of the city. Disher, Hamrick & Myers currently has several beautiful historic homes for sale South of Broad that will fulfill all your Southern home dreams. These include 20 South Adgers Wharf, 21 Colonial Street, 53 South Battery and 46 Murray Blvd as well as condos at 1 King Street and 52 South Battery. Let our team of Charleston real estate agents show you a piece of history you just can’t find anywhere else!

View All Homes For Sale South of Broad

 

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Murray Vocational School

Disher, Hamrick & Myers takes this opportunity to look back at a school that operated South of Broad for almost 50 years: the Andrew B. Murray Vocational School. The school was named for Andrew Buist Murray, who had grown up in the Charleston Orphan House. He became one of the city’s most successful businessmen and one of its richest citizens and most prolific patrons. He also served on City Council.

ANDREW MURRAY & CONSTRUCTION

3 Chisolm Street, 103 facadeBeginning in 1909, Murray encouraged the city to fill in mash land on the peninsula. Among the streets created were Murray Boulevard on the Battery, which was named for him, and Chisolm Street. The latter was named for a family that ran a rice and lumber mill in the area since 1830. (The area now known as the Horse Lot was the mill pond. It was filled in and is now a public park.) To give back to the city, Murray donated the land at 3 Chisolm Street along most of the money to build a vocational school – the first of its kind in South Carolina.

Construction on Murray Vocational School began in 1922 and was completed in 1923. The 3-story main building was designed by architect David B. Hyer, who had been superintendent of construction at the Charleston Navy Yard and also built Buist Academy on Calhoun Street. Its Neoclassical Revival style was popular for civic buildings at the time. Construction was considered fireproof. Interior spaces included shops, offices, a lunch room, classrooms, a library, lab, print shop and lecture room. A 2-story brick custodian’s cottage was also on the property. Today it is the only school caretaker’s housing remaining in the city.

MURRAY VOCATIONAL SCHOOL CLASSES

Boys over the age of 14 initially could enroll in one of two tracks: auto mechanics or wood working. Practical hands-on instruction took up half the day, while general instruction in related fields of science, math and drawing comprised the other half. As most institutions of the time, the school was segregated and only served whites. It was also originally all-male. In the 1930s girls were admitted, but with a different set of courses: cosmetology, home economics or sales. During WWII, focus switched to preparing students for the war effort.

LATER HISTORY

In 1950 the school expanded with a new auto shop because cars since the 1940s were too big to fit in the old location. This structure also served as a gym and still stands today. Murray Vocational School held public school day classes, as well as night classes for adults, until 1970. Then from 1970-1995 it was the Charleston School District offices. The building was abandoned when the school district completed its new headquarters on Calhoun Street. It was also briefly used by the US Coast Guard, but stood mostly vacant from 1995-2001. In 2002 it was named to the National Register of Historic Places, eligible for both its architecture and its historic value representing a vocational school and a segregated school.

3 CHISOLM STREET TODAY

3 Chisolm Street 103 courtyard1In the early 2000s, the main school building, gym/shop and caretakers’s cottage were restored and converted into condominiums. A very successful example of adaptive reuse, the exterior remains largely the same as when it was the Murray Vocational School. Many original interior features were also preserved. The renovation received a Carolopolis Award in 2003.

Today, 3 Chisolm Street condos take advantage of the building’s civic and industrial past with soaring ceilings, striking large-scale windows, and wide-open living spaces. The courtyard is beautifully landscaped and offers residents an outdoor gathering space. The “Horse Lot” park is right across the street for exercise or dog-walking. Colonial Lake is a short walk away. Off-street parking is included. If you desire a contemporary loft lifestyle while still being South of Broad in Historic Downtown Charleston, 3 Chisolm Street is for you! Disher, Hamrick & Myers has sold several condominiums in this building. Please contact one of our agents today if you would like to make 3 Chisolm Street your Downtown Charleston home.

 

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French Quarter Art Walk

Disher, Hamrick & Myers is proud to be located in the heart of the city’s original commercial district on Broad Street in the French Quarter of historic downtown Charleston. And one of our neighborhood’s favorite events is coming up on October 14  (postponed from October 7 due to Hurricane Matthew). The first Friday in March, May, October and December is the Charleston Gallery Association’s French Quarter Art Walk. Over 40 galleries and shops stay open from 5-8 in the evening to welcome art lovers and guests. Many serve wine and light refreshments and host artists and exhibit openings. USAToday named the art walk one of the  10BEST “Free Things to Do” in Charleston.

Highlights of the first art walk of the fall will include:

ART WALK INSIDER TIPS

All the participants are within walking distance and maps can be picked up at any location. You may start at any one and visit as many as you wish at your own pace. Strike up a lively conversation with a gallery owner or artist. Discuss your reaction to a painting or sculpture, and maybe even find a piece to add to your own collection. Art prices are very accessible, ranging from some prints and original pieces available for under $50 to larger pieces of fine art and jewelry priced in the tens of thousands of dollars. There is truly the opportunity for everyone to find something they can afford and enjoy.

French Quarter art walkArchitecture buffs should be sure to take advantage of the opportunity to see inside and behind the buildings normally only glimpsed from the street front. To make the most of your experience, venture off the beaten path to shops and galleries that are located in alleyways or on the second or third levels of buildings. The streets will be bustling with locals and visitors of all ages.

After the art walk, treat yourself to a cocktail or dinner at one of the French Quarter’s restaurants, like the upscale Oak Steakhouse or Disher, Hamrick & Myers’ neighbor, the recently reopened Blind Tiger Pub. The weather should be pleasantly warm and sunny, presenting the perfect opportunity to stroll the historic streets of downtown Charleston. Beautiful weather, art, architecture, food, drink and company – what more could you ask for on a Friday evening? We look forward to seeing you all there!

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