French Quarter Art Walk

Disher, Hamrick & Myers is proud to be located in the heart of the city’s original commercial district on Broad Street in the French Quarter of historic downtown Charleston. And one of our neighborhood’s favorite events is the Charleston Gallery Association’s French Quarter Art Walk. Several times a year, over 40 galleries and shops stay open from 5-8 on a Friday evening to welcome art lovers and guests. Many serve wine and light refreshments and host artists and exhibit openings. USAToday named the Art Walk one of the  10BEST “Free Things to Do” in Charleston.

 

ART WALK INSIDER TIPS

All the participants are within walking distance and maps can be picked up at any location. You may start at any one and visit as many as you wish at your own pace. Strike up a lively conversation with a gallery owner or artist. Discuss your reaction to a painting or sculpture, and maybe even find a piece to add to your own collection. Art prices are very accessible. Prints and original pieces are available for under $50. Larger pieces of fine art and jewelry are priced up to the tens of thousands of dollars. There is truly the opportunity for everyone to find something they can afford and enjoy.

Architecture buffs should be sure to take advantage of the opportunity to see inside and behind the buildings normally only glimpsed from the street front. To make the most of your experience, venture off the beaten path to shops and galleries that are located in alleyways or on the second or third levels of buildings. The streets will be bustling with locals and visitors of all ages.

French Quarter art walk

After the Art Walk, treat yourself to a cocktail or dinner at one of the French Quarter’s restaurants, like the upscale Oak Steakhouse or Disher, Hamrick & Myers’ neighbor, the Blind Tiger Pub. The weather should be pleasantly warm and sunny, presenting the perfect opportunity to stroll the historic streets of downtown Charleston. Beautiful weather, art, architecture, food, drink, and company – what more could you ask for on a Friday evening? We look forward to seeing you all there!

 

Share this post:

A Tale of Two Charleston Live Theatres

Charleston is home to many firsts, including America’s first museum, first golf course, first regularly-scheduled passenger train, and of course the first historic district. But did you know we also had the first theatre – which predates America itself?

That’s right, New York’s Broadway isn’t the only place famous for offering live stage performances. To this day, Charleston, South Carolina continues to present many different entertainment options, making it an enticing place to live or visit.

Two Charleston theatres are DHM’s neighbors in the French Quarter neighborhood of downtown Charleston. Each has its own place in our nation’s dramatic history. Here are their stories.

 

THE DOCK STREET THEATRE

The oldest and most famous place to experience live theatre in Charleston is the historic Dock Street Theatre. It is located on the corner of Church Street and Queen Street, which was previously named Dock Street. The original structure on the site dated to 1736 and was the very first building in the colonies constructed exclusively for live theatre.

Its first production was of George Farquhar’s rather risqué play, The Recruiting Officer. This popular 18th century script was also the first to be staged on Broadway, and continues to be performed contemporarily. The first opera recital in America, Flora, also took place at the Dock Street.

Iron Balcony at Planters Hotel, Docks Street Theatre, CharlestonThat original building was probably lost along with many of its neighbors in the Great Fire of 1740. Roughly 70 years later, in 1809, the current building was erected on the site. It operated as the Planter’s Hotel for the next 136 years. In 1835, a balcony trimmed with exquisite iron railings was added. That balcony still exists above the current entrance.

Unfortunately, the Civil War destroyed much of the rest of the hotel. It stood in disrepair until the Great Depression, when it was slated for demolition. However, in 1935, the building was purchased by the City of Charleston and renovated as a Works Progress Administration (WPA) project. The interior of the existing hotel was retrofitted to return the building to its original purpose as a live theatre.

Stage at the Dock Street Theatre, CharlestonMore than 100 years after its first opening performance, the restored Dock Street Theatre held a second grand opening in November 1937. Following historic precedent, it staged a revival of The Recruiting Officer. The revitalized theatre enjoyed decades as Charleston’s primary venue for stage performances. It earned recognition on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

But by the 21st century, the stage was showing its age. Dated facilities and uncomfortable seating drew from its appeal. This time, the City of Charleston undertook a state-of-the-art renovation. Completed in March 2010, it leaves the Dock Street well-equipped to enter its fourth century at the heart of Charleston’s artistic community.

Dock Street Theatre, Charleston, SCSince 1978, Charleston Stage has been the resident theatrical company at the Dock Street. They produce more than 100 performances each year. Today, you can experience live theatre in America’s first playhouse, as countless residents and visitors alike have over the years. The current schedule is available here.

 

THE QUEEN STREET PLAYHOUSE

While the Dock Street is the oldest physical theatre in Charleston, the Footlight Players are the longest existing theatre company in the city. Formed in 1931, they originally acted on various stages around Charleston, including the Dock Street. In fact, they are the troupe who performed at the 1937 second opening of the Dock Street Theatre. They remained in residence there until 1941.

Queen Street Playhouse, Charleston, SCBy that time, the Players realized the need for their own performance space. They had purchased a c. 1850 cotton warehouse at 20 Queen Street back in 1934. That facility initially functioned as storage and scenery construction space, but soon proved an ideal location for their needs. Volunteers remodeled the building into a true community playhouse.

Over the next few decades, the Footlight Players regularly performed at their own theatre as well as the Dock Street and other locations throughout the city. In 1986, they moved exclusively to the Queen Street location. However, it was more than 30 years later, in August 2018, that the current name was adopted. Today, the Footlight Players host dozens of live performances each year at the rebranded Queen Street Playhouse.

 

OTHER CHARLESTON THEATRES

There are plenty of other live theatre venues in the Charleston area. Light-hearted comedy, mystery, magic, and musical shows make for a fun night on the town. Pure Theatre and the Woolfe Street Playhouse are more contemporary spaces, while the grand Gaillard Center and the North Charleston Performing Arts Center bring in national and international artists and productions. And don’t forget our local college and university drama departments. Even with all these choices, the Dock Street Theatre and Queen Street Playhouse retain their own revered places in Charleston’s dramatic history.

 

Share this post:

French Quarter Art Walk

Disher, Hamrick & Myers is proud to be located in the heart of the city’s original commercial district on Broad Street in the French Quarter of historic downtown Charleston. And one of our neighborhood’s favorite events is coming up. The first Friday in March, May, October and December is the Charleston Gallery Association’s French Quarter Art Walk. Over 40 galleries and shops stay open from 5-8 in the evening to welcome art lovers and guests. Many serve wine and light refreshments and host artists and exhibit openings. USAToday named the art walk one of the  10BEST “Free Things to Do” in Charleston.

ART WALK INSIDER TIPS

All the participants are within walking distance and maps can be picked up at any location. You may start at any one and visit as many as you wish at your own pace. Strike up a lively conversation with a gallery owner or artist. Discuss your reaction to a painting or sculpture, and maybe even find a piece to add to your own collection. Art prices are very accessible, ranging from prints and original pieces available for under $50 to larger pieces of fine art and jewelry priced in the tens of thousands of dollars. There is truly the opportunity for everyone to find something they can afford and enjoy.

French Quarter art walkArchitecture buffs should be sure to take advantage of the opportunity to see inside and behind the buildings normally only glimpsed from the street front. To make the most of your experience, venture off the beaten path to shops and galleries that are located in alleyways or on the second or third levels of buildings. The streets will be bustling with locals and visitors of all ages.

After the art walk, treat yourself to a cocktail or dinner at one of the French Quarter’s restaurants, like the upscale Oak Steakhouse or Disher, Hamrick & Myers’ neighbor, the Blind Tiger Pub. The weather should be pleasantly warm and sunny, presenting the perfect opportunity to stroll the historic streets of downtown Charleston. Beautiful weather, art, architecture, food, drink and company – what more could you ask for on a Friday evening? We look forward to seeing you all there!

Email Marketing by Benchmark

Share this post:

Housing Your College Student in Charleston

If your daughter or son is attending one of the many colleges in Charleston, SC, you have several housing options. While many students will choose to live in a dormitory or rent an apartment, you should also consider buying a home near campus. Owning a rental home can be a worthwhile financial investment, as well as an educational experience for your child. Purchasing the property your student lives in while attending school offers many benefits:

  • Stability. Your student will be in the same location during their college years. There will not be a need for yearly apartment hunting.
  • Storage. Furniture and other belongings can remain in the home while you own it, saving both time and money.
  • Fixed expenses. Generally, rent in Charleston increases every year. The average rent for an apartment in the downtown area is over $2300 per month. By buying your property with a fixed rate mortgage, the housing expense will be fixed for the duration of ownership. Keep in mind, you will also avoid paying security deposits and moving utility services.
  • Responsibility. Your child receives a lesson in real estate investing as well as the responsibility that comes with owning property.
  • Financial benefits. Your financial gains include possible appreciation in value, equity build up and the opportunity to charge rent to housemates.

Of course, there are some things to watch out for when considering buying a home for your student. College students are generally on the move, so staying in one location for four or five years could present a challenge. If you rent rooms in the home, you become landlords and your student may have to deal with irresponsible housemates. General maintenance costs are also something to remember when purchasing an investment property. Be sure to factor additional expenses into your formula.

 

FINANCING OPTIONS

When it comes to the actual purchase of your investment property, there are many options available for the title and financing. Some parents include the student’s name on the title for owner-occupied tax benefits, while some opt to buy strictly as a rental property. There are several ways to hold the title, so speak with your attorney and tax advisor to determine the best route for you.

When you have decided to move forward with a purchase, your lending institution should offer several strategies. If your student will be named on the title of the property, using a FHA “kiddie condo” loan is a good option. This program allows your student to qualify for the loan as a co-borrower with a blood relative. There is a maximum loan amount, so check here for limits in the location of interest. Another option is to use a non-owner occupied loan with conventional financing. Interest-only loans are also available that may have a lower monthly payment.

Should you wish to rent extra rooms to supplement the mortgage payment and share expenses, have each housemate sign a written agreement. Standard rental agreements can be obtained through your real estate agent or lawyer. The rental document needs to address the term of the lease, rate and due date for payments, security deposit, parking, pets, utility payments, maximum occupancy and notice to vacate.

college student graduationWhen your student graduates or is moving on, you have several options. You can keep the property as an investment rental. If you have another child who attends the same school, you can make a similar arrangement with him or her. You can also exchange the home for another investment property in another location in a 1031 exchange. Or you can always sell the property and realize any profits from increased value.

Disher, Hamrick & Myers has homes for sale near the College of Charleston and MUSC that would make ideal student residences or investment properties. Buying a house for your college student has many advantages. To learn more and decide if this is the right strategy for your family, call Katherine Falls at 843.478.0495 today.

Share this post:

The Best Ways to Enjoy the Outdoors in Charleston This Fall

The fall season is a busy time in Charleston, with plenty of events and activities to do. You’ll enjoy the cooling temperatures that still allow for plenty of time spent outdoors. Charleston is known to be the top city to visit in the Carolinas, one of the best places to live and even one of the top places for dogs–so you can be sure to find a variety of things to do outdoors. From parks, to tours, to water activities, there is always something to do in Charleston. Check out these best ways to enjoy the outdoors in Charleston this fall.

 

SEE FALL COLORS

Hampton Park is the place to to see the beauty of the season with the changing fall leaves. This 60-acre park is one of the largest in Charleston and features beautiful gardens as well as plenty of deciduous trees. You’ll find paved walkways to stroll along with adequate restroom facilities. Use different trails throughout the park to see a wide variety of trees and shrubs that will begin to change color with the cooling fall temperatures.

 

GO SAILING

sailboats outdoors - fall in Charleston

Getting out on the water is a prime activity in Charleston. Consider one of the many charters that will take you sailing. Fall is a great time to sail, as it isn’t too hot on the water. Consider a sunset sail to view the beautiful sunsets over the water as well the coastline in its full fall glory. Dinner options are available for those wanting to eat aboard, as well as more educational opportunities for those wishing to learn the ropes of sailing.

 

TAKE A GHOST TOUR

Taking a ghost tour in the fall is fitting for the spooky season. Charleston is well-known for being not only a historic settlement, but also a place filled haunted buildings. There are many different options for ghost tours, but the most popular is the Haunted Jail Tour. You’ll learn a lot about the history of Charleston as well as past residents…that may still be hanging around.

 

ENJOY A CARRIAGE RIDE

There is nothing better than snuggling up with a loved one and enjoying a ride through downtown. Charleston is known for horse-drawn carriages that take you all around the city. Many different tour companies welcome you on board for a lovely stroll through the historic area. Take a carriage ride during the day to get a great view of the fall colors that dot the area.

 

CATCH YOUR DINNER

friends fishing outdoors - fall in CharlestonKnown for its fantastic fishing opportunities, Charleston is a place you can catch your own dinner. Many fishing guides take you out on the Lowcountry’s tidal waters that supply redfish, speckled sea trout and flounder. Other favorite spots are the reefs near the shoreline, where you can catch varieties like black sea bass and king mackerel. Residents and tourists alike can try their hand at the world-class fishing available in the area’s waters.

 

ATTEND AN OYSTER ROAST

And if you prefer not to have to catch your own dinner, but still want to enjoy a Lowcountry seafood specialty, be sure to attend an oyster roast. Oyster season kicks off in the fall and continues through any month with an R. Most weekends, you’ll find locals and visitors shucking buckets of the steamed bivalves. Just be sure to bring your oyster gloves, knives and hot sauce!

 

GET IN THE HOLIDAY SPIRIT

The Holiday Festival of Lights opens in early November and has been voted one of the best Christmas light displays in the country. The show is located at James Island County Park and is a driving tour that you can enjoy from the comfort of your car. However, make sure to park and explore all of the other things that the Holiday Festival of Lights has to offer, like the sand sculpture, holiday train and carousel. While it may be the end of fall, the Festival of Lights will quickly put you in the holiday spirit.

Not only does the Charleston area boast many outdoor activities, but the full range of activities caters to a broad demographic. Those looking for a relaxing time outside can take a carriage ride or walk through a park. Thrill seekers can find ghost tours, fishing charters and sailing out on the water for more upbeat activities. Whatever you choose, consider one of these best ways to enjoy the outdoors in Charleston this autumn.

What are your favorite fall activities in Charleston? Let us know (and post your pics!) in the comments.

Author David Wheeler is a landscape design writer and nature enthusiast. He is an avid traveler and loves to spend his time hiking and strolling through magnificent gardens, learning about rare and native flowers across the world.

Share this post:

The Games Charlestonians Play

As with many things in life, Charlestonians take liberties with the ordinary rules of leisurely games. It’s no surprise that the same city where people sit on piazzas instead of porches, order drinks “2, 3 ways” and consider madras bowties formal wear, has created its own versions of several standard activities. Here, we look at 3 of the more popular.

BEACH GOLF

beach golfCharleston’s take on beach golf was invented in the early 1990s by native Thomas “Big T” Alexander. It requires a beach and at least two players, each with a putter and ball. But after this, there are no formal rules. Scoring, course layout and other details are left to the discretion of whoever brings the playing equipment — and refreshments. This player outlines a fairway and green in the sand and establishes par. He or she also decides the order of play, whether a putt can be re-hit in mid-roll if it’s headed into the Atlantic, and if penalties incur. Rules can even change mid-swing. The leader also keeps the score, a job that virtually guarantees a lopsided win.

 

HALF RUBBER

Although it’s been played for at least 90 years, no one can say where half rubber started. Charleston claims to be the official birthplace, but so does Florence, Myrtle Beach and Savannah. As its name suggests, half rubber is played with half of a rubber ball. Some purists say the proper tool to produce this object is a deli-style meat slicer. Just shave off pieces of a rubber ball until the desired shape is reached. (Those pieces make handy coasters.) But if you don’t know a deli owner, a pocket knife will serve nicely. Next, you need about four feet of a broomstick. You can even buy a stick and half a ball prepackaged, but purists may razz you about your store-bought equipment.

Play requires three or more people. If you play with three, it’s every man for himself. If more, you divide into teams. One person pitches, one catches and a third stands between them swinging the stick. The half-ball’s unique shape results in dips and curves. Making contact is so difficult, any hit is considered a single. A miss is a strike, unless the catcher also catches it, which makes it an out. By some rules, a tipped ball caught by the catcher counts as two outs. You’re also out after three strikes or if you hit a fly that’s caught. Three outs and your inning is over. The game continues until reaching a pre-agreed number of innings, until the half rubber disappears down a storm drain, or until happy hour starts.

 

BOCCE

bocce

Egyptians played a Bocce-like game 7000 years ago, but credit for the modern version goes to the Italians. The pallina is a small ball. A player from one team throws it a few yards away and then two teams alternately throw larger balls at it. Points are scored by landing your ball close to the pallina. The more balls you leave inside your opponents’ closest ball, the more points you score. Spocking (or bombing) is the art of hitting an opponent’s close ball and knocking it into the Mediterranean, or whatever ocean you have handy. This aspect of the game also translates nicely to Charleston. While bocce is usually played on a finely manicured lawn, in Charleston, it’s played on the beach. This leads to some interesting play, with challenges such as sand dunes, tidal pools, sunbathers, sand castles, shells and the incoming or outgoing tide.

Beach golf, bocce and half rubber add their charm to the many other unique Lowcountry traditions that once led a Civil War era statesman to describe South Carolina as a place “too small to be a republic and too large to be an asylum.” Regardless of the implications of that statement, Charlestonians are happy with their games and are unimpressed by how anyone plays them anywhere else.

 

Share this post:

Cannonborough-Elliotborough

Cannonborough-Elliotborough is an up-and-coming transitional neighborhood populated by students, young professionals and long-time local families. Rife with redevelopment, it offers some of the more affordable housing (both fixer-uppers and renovations) on the Charleston peninsula, as well as a number of hip restaurants, corner stores and cocktail joints all within walking distance.

 

LOCATION

Located on the downtown Charleston peninsula, the Cannonborough-Elliotborough neighborhood is bordered by the Crosstown (Septima P. Clark) Espressway on the north, Bee and Morris Streets to the South, President Street on the east and King Street to the west. Rutledge Avenue creates the boundary between Cannonborough to its west and Elliottborough to its east, but today, the two neighborhoods function as one with no border. Much of the land was originally marsh that has since been filled in. Major roads include Spring, Rutledge, Bogard and Line Streets. The MUSC campus, College of Charleston, Charleston School of Law, Upper King Street and the Crosstown–with access to all areas of Charleston–are all nearby.

 

HISTORY

The area was first settled 1785 by Col. Barnard Elliot, a planter and member of the Provincial Congress for whom Elliotborough is named. Cannonborough is named after Daniel Cannon, a carpenter and mechanic who owned several lumber mills in the area. Throughout its history, it has been populated by blue-collar workers and ethnic groups. As agriculture gave way to industry in the mid-19th century, lumber mills and shipping and rail lines moved into the area to take advantage of its lower costs. With them came blue-collar workers, immigrants of various ethnicities and freed slaves. German, Irish, Polish and Jewish residents lived alongside African-American and working-class whites.

During the mid-20th century, Cannonborough-Elliotborough experienced the same “white flight” as other American cities, and became largely African American. The completion of the Crosstown in 1967 disrupted the residential climate of the area and furthered its decline throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Today, the neighborhood is experiencing a revitalization that is returning it to its roots with a mix of workers, students, older residents and young families. The recent conversion of Cannon and Spring Streets from one-way thoroughfares to two-way traffic seeks to further encourage community growth.

 

NOTABLE BUILDINGS

Cannonborough-Elliotborough has always been known for its vernacular architecture rather than the grand mansions and gardens in other parts of historic Charleston. However, it does have its own noteworthy structures. For example, it contains a high concentration of the city’s remaining Freedman’s cottages. Charleston single houses and Victorian homes dwell next to more modern structures. While the area is mostly residential, churches and small local businesses also dot the area. And it has a greater concentration of corner stores than other parts of downtown Charleston.

 

CANNONBOROUGH-ELLIOTBOROUGH RESTAURANTS

In the past few years, several of these corner stores and other structures have become home to local favorite joints as well as new and exciting culinary concepts. Residents and visitors alike flock to the area to enjoy restaurants including:

Cannonborough-Elliotborough even has its fair share of fine dining such as:

If you are looking to join a diverse, growing community where property values are still relatively reasonable for downtown Charleston, consider making this neighborhood your new home.

View All Homes For Sale in Cannonborough-Elliotborough

 

Share this post:

Feel at Home in Harleston Village

Downtown’s Harleston Village — bordered by Calhoun, Broad and King Streets and the Ashley River — is one of Charleston’s oldest neighborhoods. The land was granted to John Coming and Henry Hughes in 1671-1672. John was first mate on the Carolina, one of the first ships to bring settlers to the colony. Upon Coming’s death, the property passed to his wife’s nephew, John Harleston. The Harleston family was active in colonial government, and the subsequent neighborhood inherited this surname. The village was developed for residential and other uses by 1770. Its streets were named after prominent men of the day, including Beaufain, Bull, Gadsden, Montagu, Pitt and Rutledge. Tidal marshes along the Ashley River powered numerous lumber mills that dotted the area until the arrival of steam power in the 1880s. Housing also continued to populate the neighborhood throughout the 18th and 19th centuries.

Harleston Village is the home to several historic “firsts.” The College of Charleston was established in 1770, the same year as the neighborhood. The CofC is the oldest educational institution in the state, and indeed the oldest south of Virginia. It was also the nation’s first municipal college. The first golf club in America, c. 1786, played in Harleston Village. The golf course is likely the origin of the appellation “Harleston Green,” which is another common name for the neighborhood.

 

PUBLIC PARKS

At the heart of Harleston Village is Colonial Lake Park. Its origins date back to 1768, when an Act of the Commons House of Assembly set aside land for a park that would always remain for public use. It was known as the Colonial Commons. By 1869, what became known as the Rutledge Street Pond was completed. For decades, small boats were allowed on the water. In 1881, it was renamed Colonial Lake after the old Colonial Commons, and that name remains today. In the early 1880s, a landscaped promenade was built around the lake. The grounds have been continually improved, with the most recent overhaul having just been completed in 2016. Today, the picturesque park is surrounded by grand old homes and attracts families, dog walkers, joggers and visitors alike. Across Ashley Avenue is Moultrie Playground, which also has tennis and basketball courts, a baseball field and picnic areas. These facilities make the area popular with families, outdoor enthusiasts, and fitness buffs alike.

Columns of the Old Charleston Museum, Cannon Park, Harleston Village, Downtown CharlestonAnother popular public space in Harleston Village is Cannon Park, which houses the columns of the old Charleston Museum, which burned down in 1981. But that site is not the only place where you might experience the ghosts of Charleston past in Harleston Village. Another square that was reserved for public use in 1680 became the site of a hospital, poor house, runaway slave workhouse and eventually the Old Charleston Jail – reputed to be one of Charleston’s most haunted places. Most recently used by the American College of the Building Arts, the structure is now under consideration for renovation into office space that will also allow for tours of the site.

 

A WALKABLE NEIGHBORHOOD

Much of the neighborhood is walkable, with markets, coffee shops, and restaurants all nearby. Some of the more popular dining options, from fine dining to waterfront casual, are:

Harleston Village has a diverse mix of housing. Options range from historic 18th, 19th and 20th century mansions, to converted condominiums (like 55 Ashley Avenue, once the Baker Hospital), to more modern homes and tall condo buildings. With the College of Charleston inside its borders, you‘ll find a combination of students and renters along with homeowners. This is an ideal location for investment properties as well as primary residences. DHM currently has an excellent investment opportunity in Harleston Village consisting of 4 multifamily homes with off-street parking for 20 vehicles. For more information and help navigating the real estate market in Harleston Village, count on Disher, Hamrick & Myers to Open Every Door…

View All Homes For Sale in Harleston Village

 

Share this post:

A View of Charleston Harbor

Charleston Harbor is where locals like to say “the Ashley and Cooper Rivers come together to form the Atlantic Ocean.” While this might be a little hyperbole, the waterway is and always has been crucial to life in Charleston, SC.

HISTORY

The city was founded on its banks because of the prime location, providing easy access to water transportation before inland roadways were available. Downtown Charleston’s finest homes were built along the harbor, and meant to be seen from the water. Merchants would watch their ships enter the local waterways from piazzas or widow’s walks. The location was also ideal for defense and sprung several fortifications including Fort Moultrie, Fort Sumter, Fort Johnson and Castle Pinckney – all of which figured prominently in the Civil War. The Confederate H.L. Hunley carried out the first successful wartime submarine attack in the harbor. On the night of February 17, 1864, it sunk the Union USS Housatonic before disappearing for over 100 years. In 2000, spectators again lined the banks of the harbor to watch the Hunley ceremoniously be raised from its watery resting spot.

CHARLESTON HARBOR PORTS

Charleston Harbor & Ravenel bridgeFrom Colonial times until the present, Charleston has been one of the busiest posts on the east coast. In its earliest days, it transported lumber, rice, cotton, tobacco, naval stores, indigo, and animal furs and skins. This trade made Charleston one of the wealthiest cities in the Americas. Today, it services containerized as well as breakbulk shipments, plus cars. The South Carolina State Ports Authority owns and operates public terminals in downtown Charleston, Mt. Pleasant, and North Charleston. There are private terminals as well. The Army Corps of Engineers is currently deepening the harbor to accommodate the largest post-Panamax vessels.

Charleston Harbor also serves as home port and a port of call for cruise ships by Carnival and Royal Caribbean. Tourists are able to stroll the streets of our historic district for a day, while locals and visitors can sail to the Bahamas and other Caribbean locales right from home.

ATTRACTIONS

Patriots Point – home of the Naval & Maritime Museum featuring the USS Yorktown and the Medal of Honor Museum, Patriots Point Links and the Charleston Harbor Resort & Marina.

South Carolina Aquarium – with exhibits and hands-on activities highlighting South Carolina habitats “from the mountains to the sea.”

Fort Sumter Tours – enjoy a boat ride through Charleston Harbor out to the fort where the Civil War started.

Charleston Harbor Tours – another option to cruise through history and sights.

Battery – with its grand antebellum mansions and White Point Gardens.

Riley Waterfront Park – home of the famous Pineapple Fountain, as well as a popular splash fountain, pier with bench swings and green space.

Ravenel Bridgeconnecting Charleston and Mt. Pleasant, with stunning views from its popular walking and biking lanes.

Memorial Waterfront Park – located East of the Cooper, tucked under the bridge. It features a pier, playground and sweetgrass basket pavilion.

Boating and Sailing – the ultimate way to enjoy Charleston Harbor and its beautiful weather.

 

Charleston Harbor viewCharleston Harbor is one of the most picturesque, as well as most utilized, areas of Charleston. Disher, Hamrick & Myers lists properties with views of the harbor from downtown Charleston, as well as James Island and Mt. Pleasant. Homes with panoramic harbor views currently available include 2 Wharfside Street 2D and several Dockside Condominiums. Call our office at 843.577.4115 today to let us help you find the perfect home on Charleston Harbor!

 

Share this post:

South of Broad – A Walk Through History

Take a step back into history and explore the beautiful antebellum neighborhood South of Broad in Charleston, South Carolina. The district dates back to 1721 and features rare historic homes amongst cobblestone streets. One of the true gems of the South, this neighborhood is a beloved part of downtown Charleston. It boasts traditional southern architecture and homes that look straight out of an American storybook.

St Michael's, South of BroadWhile Charleston has many beautiful and unique neighborhoods to offer residents and visitors alike, South Broad is arguably the most renowned. Located between the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, many of its well-preserved homes offer views of the Charleston Harbor. It encompasses the original walled city of Charleston as well as early-20th century infill projects. Famous Rainbow Row is located South Broad. This stretch of East Bay Street hosts several colonial Georgian row homes painted different pastel colors and is a top tourist attraction in Charleston. The Four Corners of Law, so-named by Robert Ripley, is at the intersection of Meeting and Broad Streets. In this part of town you’ll see guests in horse-drawn carriages viewing the grand mansions.

ATTRACTIONS

Some key sites to visit South of Broad include:

Battery and White Point Garden: a public park with Spanish moss-draped oaks and Civil War cannons. It is bounded by a seawall walkway where Charlestonians like to say the Ashley and Cooper Rivers combine to create the Atlantic Ocean.

Sword Gate House: the oldest residence on Legare Street, with its famous wrought iron gates that match the pair at the Citadel.

Heyward-Washington House: a museum house of The Charleston Museum. Declaration of Independence signer Thomas Heyward, Jr. lived there. President George Washington stayed there during his 1791 visit to the city.

Edmonston-Alston House: another residence that is open to the public. Stand on the porch where General P.G.T. Beauregard watched the bombardment of Ft. Sumter, starting the Civil War. Still owned by the Alstons, its collection houses many historic family pieces.

Calhoun Mansion: the largest private home in Charleston. You may tour this Italianate beauty’s extensive collection of decorative arts and furniture, and even access the widow’s walk for an incomparable birds-eye view of the lower peninsula.

Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon: one of the America’s most-important Colonial civic structures. Your tour includes one of the few places to see an exposed part of Charleston’s original wall.

SOUTH OF BROAD DINING

Don’t take offense if someone refers to you as an SOB; in Charleston, it’s a moniker for those who live South of Broad. A popular restaurant just up East Bay Street has made a clever play on this term, calling itself SNOB, short for Slightly North of Broad. Enjoy their local shrimp and grits for dinner or Sunday brunch.

The Battery, South of BroadWhile the area is mostly residential, you’ll also find plenty to entertain. Stroll through the shops and art galleries along Broad Street and the French Quarter or attend one of the quarterly Art Walks. For a bite to eat, enjoy a glass of wine and a cheese plate at goat.sheep.cow, which is housed in a building over 200 years old. In nice weather, why not pack a picnic lunch for White Point Gardens? For a relaxed meal in a social atmosphere, you have the Blind Tiger Pub, named for Charleston’s infamous speakeasies. In the mood for French food? Join a communal table at Gaulart & Maliclet. If you prefer a fine-dining option, try Oak Steakhouse. And to wet your whistle, be sure to stop by The Tavern to pick up some local spirits. Founded in 1686, it’s the oldest liquor store in the country.

As you explore the alleyways and streets South of Broad, you’ll notice the unique Charleston Single House style of architecture that lends the city much of its historic charm. Most of the homes are covered by easements to retain this historic look and fabric of the city. Disher, Hamrick & Myers regularly has several beautiful historic homes and condos for sale South of Broad that will fulfill all your Southern home dreams. Let our team of Charleston real estate agents show you a piece of history you just can’t find anywhere else!

View All Homes For Sale South of Broad

 

Share this post: